Prestartup Reviews

Ebook: Prestartup Reviews

Price

$31.50 USD

Purchase

To purchase this ebook please visit the publisher, Science Direct.

Publications

In addition to this ebook, we offer the following publications to do with prestartup/operational readiness reviews.

Overview

The purpose of a Prestartup Review (PSR) is to make sure that the safety of a new or modified system as installed has not been compromised during the equipment purchase or construction phases. Readiness reviews are important because projects frequently fall behind schedule and/or run over budget, thus creating pressure on the project team to eliminate or postpone the installation of any items that are not absolutely necessary for the start-up. If not controlled properly this can lead to corner-cutting — either intentional or inadvertent — which may in turn jeopardize the safety or operability of the modified facility. The PSR gives the operations department the authority to refuse to accept “care, custody, and control” of a facility that they judge to be unsafe or difficult to operate or that does not conform to the initial specifications. In effect, a PSR provides a breathing space for everyone to make sure that the plant that they are about to start is safe.

PSRs are also referred to as Prestartup Safety Reviews (PSSR) (the OSHA term) and Operational Readiness Reviews, and are generally incorporated into process safety regulations. As with most process safety activities, a PSR will generally be performed by a small team made up of representatives from operations, maintenance, engineering, and safety.

PSRs are used for all types and size of project, ranging from major grass-roots projects all the way to small facility upgrades. They are important because projects frequently fall behind schedule and/or run over budget, thus creating pressure on the project team to eliminate or postpone the installation of any items that are not absolutely necessary for the start-up. If not controlled properly, this can lead to corner-cutting — either intentional or inadvertent — which may in turn jeopardize the safety or operability of the modified facility. The review gives the operations department the authority to refuse to accept “care, custody and control” of a facility that they judge to be unsafe or difficult to operate. In effect, a PSR provides a breathing space for everyone to make sure that the modified system that they are about to start is safe and operable.

The purpose of a Prestartup Review (PSR) is to make sure that the safety of a new or modified system as installed has not been compromised during the equipment purchase or construction phases. Readiness reviews are important because projects frequently fall behind schedule and/or run over budget, thus creating pressure on the project team to eliminate or postpone the installation of any items that are not absolutely necessary for the start-up. If not controlled properly this can lead to corner-cutting — either intentional or inadvertent — which may in turn jeopardize the safety or operability of the modified facility. The PSR gives the operations department the authority to refuse to accept “care, custody, and control” of a facility that they judge to be unsafe or difficult to operate or that does not conform to the initial specifications. In effect, a PSR provides a breathing space for everyone to make sure that the plant that they are about to start is safe.

PSRs are also referred to as Prestartup Safety Reviews (PSSR) (the OSHA term) and Operational Readiness Reviews, and are generally incorporated into process safety regulations. As with most process safety activities, a PSR will generally be performed by a small team made up of representatives from operations, maintenance, engineering, and safety.

PSRs are used for all types and size of project, ranging from major grass-roots projects all the way to small facility upgrades. They are important because projects frequently fall behind schedule and/or run over budget, thus creating pressure on the project team to eliminate or postpone the installation of any items that are not absolutely necessary for the start-up. If not controlled properly, this can lead to corner-cutting — either intentional or inadvertent — which may in turn jeopardize the safety or operability of the modified facility. The review gives the operations department the authority to refuse to accept “care, custody and control” of a facility that they judge to be unsafe or difficult to operate. In effect, a PSR provides a breathing space for everyone to make sure that the modified system that they are about to start is safe and operable.

Table of Contents

Introduction
What the Review Is Not
Regulations 
   OSHA’s PSM 
      (i)  Construction and Equipment
      (ii)   Procedures 
      (iii)  New / Modified Facilities
   BSEE 
   EPA 
Types of Review 
   Review Not Required
   Small Projects / Engineering Changes
   Medium Size
   Large Projects 
   Restart Reviews 
Organization of a PSR
   Time Required
   Team Structure
Using the Elements of Process Safety Management
   Compliance
   Knowledge Management
   Operating Procedures
   Asset Integrity / Reliability
   Training / Performance 
   Management of Change 
   Management Review

Copyright © Ian Sutton. 2018. All Rights Reserved.